New Indiana Rule Enhances Safety for Youngest Passengers

Posted on: March 19th, 2018 by Staff

You may want to prepare for a safety directive underway in one state that could soon cascade across the country. A new regulation in Indiana Administrative Code enhances the safety of the youngest children who ride school buses. The reason for the regulation, the increased safety its implementation will provide, and what restraints are recommended, are worth diving into.

The new rule went into effect January 1, 2018, and states that any pre-K child riding in a school bus in Indiana must be secured in a proper age, weight, and size FMVSS 213 compliant child restraint system. When you think about all the children in public school or private childcare programs, this literally affects thousands of young children. This directive does not, however, apply to children attending kindergarten, elementary, middle, or high school.

Compartmentalization was never designed and doesn’t work to protect pre-K children on the bus. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found children weighing less than 50 pounds need more protection than compartmentalization provides. Why? Because their bodies have not physically developed enough to handle the impact to the seat in front of them without causing internal injuries.

For compartmentalization to be most effective, a child also needs to be sitting in proper position – upright and forward-facing. For most pre-K children, this is an unrealistic expectation. They tend to lay down on the seat, sit sideways, or in some cases, move around. CSRS, Child Safety Restraint Systems, are the solution to better protect these passengers, and there are several options available.

Three children sit on a school bus seat in their SafeGuard SuperSTARS.The first, school bus specific add-on child restraint systems, are the most popular. Like the SafeGuard STAR or SuperSTAR, they attach to the bus seat using straps called the cam wrap, which wraps over the seat back and sometimes under the seat cushion. These restraints are lightweight, portable, and take up little space. Some are even available for children weighing up to 90 pounds and may offer options for additional upper body support needed for some students.

Safety vests and safety harnesses are other common options for school buses. These restraints also attach to the school bus seat by means of a cam wrap. They are frequently used for special needs applications in school buses and even passenger cars.

Cam wraps negatively affect the performance of compartmentalization. That’s why NHTSA requires a label that states the seat behind the cam wrap must either be unoccupied or used only by a passenger who is also restrained by a CSRS or seat belt.

Another choice is the integrated child seat, or built-in child restraint. This restraint is built into the seat with a 5-point harness. They are easy to use, and no installation is needed. A flap covering the child restraint folds down to create the seating surface. Just as with regular car seats, these can be adjusted for snugness, height, and do have weight and size limitations.

The last option is conventional car seats, but they are limited by the fact that they must be installed using a seat belt or LATCH and may be difficult to install on a school bus seat. However, when transporting infants, the rear-facing infant passenger car seat is the only option available.

While your state may not have a law mandating the use of CSRS yet, knowing about Indiana’s efforts to better protect their youngest school bus riders can help your district do the same.

Snowy Weather Means Additional Challenges for School Bus Drivers

Posted on: December 12th, 2013 by admin No Comments

As I write this blog post, there is a beautiful fresh coat of snow on the ground. Winter has officially arrived, albeit a little early. We also got a little ice as an “added bonus.” More is in the forecast for today, but most of our schools are sticking to their regular schedules. That means many school buses will likely be navigating some tricky road conditions as they bring children home this afternoon. Bus drivers may face additional challenges on the streets that haven’t been plowed or salted, and with a bus full of rowdy children who just want to get home and play outside, I don’t envy them.

 

This time of year, it’s par for the course, or should I say, road. School buses have to make their way through snow and ice. We’ve all seen the news reports where one or more of them in our districts have slid off or been in an accident. Sometimes they even overturn when a tire leaves the road and suddenly the driver finds the bus tipping into a ditch the snow obscured a half second before. At SafeGuard®, we always want children to have the added protection seat belts on the school bus can bring, but in the winter time, imagine the difference they could make. Bus drivers can better focus on slippery roads. Students would be seated properly rather than in positions that could increase their chances of being injured.
Photo Credit – JF Nadeau/Radio-Canada

 

SafeGuard recently conducted two separate events to demonstrate what happens in a frontal crash when students are out of position. The results were alarming. Compartmentalization is intended to save their lives, but in an accident, the results can still lead to concussions and spinal cord injuries when the children are slammed into the seats and other students. Watch what happened at SafeGuard’s most recent crash test event. The out of position “students” did not fare well, while those in seat belts were considerably more protected.

 

The bus was only going 30mph, and this was a frontal crash, the kind of crash where compartmentalization is supposed to work best. Now imagine how badly it could fail when a bus slides off an icy road and rolls over.

Driving a bus is a tough job made more difficult by snow and ice. When I hear people say that compartmentalization is safe enough, I wonder if they would still agree after experiencing crashes like these first hand. I’m sure for the parents whose children suffer bloody noses, concussions and even worse from the very system designed to protect them might agree that “good enough” is not enough. Not when their children could have potentially been spared such injuries had then been wearing seat belts.

Marissa Cotten
December 12, 2013

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Moving Forward in School Bus Safety

Posted on: November 14th, 2013 by admin 1 Comment

Wednesday, November 13, 2013
WESTFIELD, IN

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SafeGuard®, a brand of IMMI® – the leading manufacturer of commercial safety, hosted it’s 14th School Bus Crash at the Center for Advanced Product Evaluation (CAPE®). Safety industry leaders – insurance companies, Indiana State Police officers, school bus manufacturers, and support staff – were all in attendance to witness a School Bus Safety presentation and a live demonstration of a School Bus crash.

SafeGuard and CAPE have tested more School Bus Seats than anyone else in the country. In this crash test, we placed test dummies in several different positions — restrained in three-point SafeGuard seat belts, unrestrained in base seats with out seat belts, and out-of-position (looking over the back of the seat, sitting sideways, etc.). The visual results tell the story. Are school buses safe? No one debates that. However, could they potentially be made safer for our children with increased safety measures like adding lap-shoulder belts? Absolutely.

 

Common Misinformation About Seat Belts on School Buses

  1. Compartmentalization is enough protection for students.
    FALSE. Just look what happens in a rollover – both in a real one, and in a crash test.
  2. Seat belts slow down evacuations.
    FALSE. Click here to learn how seat belts help evacuations.
  3. Seat belts reduce school bus capacity.
    FALSE. The capacity issue has been solved with the FlexSeat which comfortable fits 2 older children or 3 younger children with the added safety benefits of lap-shoulder seat belts.
  4. Seat belts can be used as weapons on the school bus.
    FALSE. While this may have been true with the older-style lap belts, our SafeGuard lap-shoulder belts are RETRACTABLE. The seat belt webbing (strap) retracts into the seat back, as they do in your car. The buckles are lightweight, making them virtually impossible to be used as weapons. Seat belts as weapons? It’s just not true anymore. Seat belts can actually improve behavior on the school bus by helping keep kids in their seats. Find out why by clicking here.
  5. Outfitting a bus with seat belts costs too much.
    FALSE. With SafeGuard belts on school buses, it’s only pennies per day over the life of a school bus (12 – 16 years). Technological advances and volume increases that have lowered costs, so Safeguard belts have never been more affordable. Costs have been reduced by as much as 52% since 2003. SafeGuard lap-shoulder belts are a one-time cost, for the life of the bus.

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No More Excuses – It’s Time for Seat Belts on School Buses.

Posted on: August 30th, 2013 by admin No Comments

There are No More Excuses® — it’s time for seat belts on school buses. With this inforgraphic below, you’ll find out the new statistics and innovations around school buses seat belts as well as the most common misconceptions on the bottom half of the graphic.

Want more information on School Bus Safety? Click here & here for articles we’ve written on the topic.

Want to start a movement in your community for seat belts on school buses? Join us on Facebook, and click here for more advocate resources.

Download the hi-res version here, and share it with your friends!

Circle Infographic -- Finished